Today I’m having an Apocalypse Comedy Day, if you will, meaning I’ll be posting two reviews: one of This Is The End and one of The World’s End. With that said, let’s have a look at…

This one's a Must-see!

This one’s a Must-see!

The five musketeers.

The five musketeers.

Comedy has scarcely been so touching!

Comedy has scarcely been so touching!

The World’s End is a film so witty, so absurd and so strangely touching in its own bizarre manner that watching it can most likely be classified as a legitimate cure for depression. Created by Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg, it serves as the final entry in their Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy, following Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz.

The film came out rather recently and is yet another 2013 film that revolves around the end of the world, although (SPOILER ALERT) the movie doesn’t feature that much destruction of the Earth itself. Even so, this is definitely one of the best of the bunch!

The story: five old friends, Gary King (Pegg), Andy Knightley (Nick Frost), Oliver “O-Man” Chamberlain (Martin Freeman), Steven Prince (Paddy Considine) and Peter Page (Eddie Marsan), are reassembled by a nostalgic Gary who has a plan for them to finish off something they started together 20 years ago when their adult lives were just beginning: the pub crawl of Newton Haven. Last time they tried it they got far too wasted to make it to the final pub on the crawl, “The World’s End”, but that’s exactly what Gary intends for them to do this time. His old comrades, having established their own lives and holding serious jobs, are reluctant to join in and recapture the team’s days of yore, but Gary’s fast to get them on his side, even though he mostly achieves it through lying about his dead mother. Who isn’t dead. Yeah, this is one of Pegg’s more jerky and narcissistic roles but it’s possibly also his best performance yet!

When they return to Newton Haven and start the crawl, though, things turn out to be not quite like they remember it. Most notably, there’s the strange behaviour of the townsfolk. This gets even more strange when it turns out that they’re not just your average townsfolk, but android-like humanoids who bleed blue blood when damaged and kick your ass when provoked. These are alien creatures who seem to have assimiliation in mind and anyone in the town, especially the ones that appear like old friendly faces from past of our heroes, could be one of them. Oh but this doesn’t make the five musketeers, which is what they call themselves, stop their crawl. Well okay, Andy, Sam, Peter and Oliver are a bit eager to get the smeg out of there in one piece but Gary King has a mission to complete and he will complete it no matter how many blue-blooded robotic human-replicas he has to battle to reach The World’s End. Hilarious action ensues.

Robot means slave, by the way.

Robot means slave, by the way.

Individuals they encounter include Oliver’s sister Sam (Rosamund Pike), their old teacher Mr. Shepherd (Pierce Brosnan) and a mysterious old man played by David Bradley, who claims to possess knowledge of what these machines are, what the thing that’s created them wants with our species and, above all, how long “it” has been here on Earth with us. Bill Nighy is also in the film but it is better if it remains a mystery whom he plays.

The World’s End is no doubt the better one out of the two apocalyptic comedies that came out this year, the other being This Is The End, which, although a very good film, would possibly have been as good as The World’s End if less jokes in it fell flat and the characters plus their interactions were slightly more fun to watch. See, that is something this film benefits tremendously from; having such a lovable and goofy set of characters who share a believable friendship whilst being beautifully embodied by some of Britain’s finest and funniest gentlemen. There’s also something about the typically British comedic back-and-forth banter and occasional absurdism that makes this one a step better than This Is The End. But this will most obviously vary from viewer to viewer.

 The friendship between Simon Pegg and Nick Frost particularly, as in most of the films they’re in together, is a sweet and genuine one. In The World’s End they’re not on very good terms, but even then it is clear that the character of Andy cares deeply for Gary, especially when the latter’s obsession with finishing what he and his friends started becomes so intense that he becomes willing to let it cost them their lives. This part is great also because of how you can understand Andy’s attempts to reason with Gary and get him to just give it up and flee a certain death, but you can meanwhile sympathize with Gary’s nostalgia and desire to be free and fulfil the day that was going to be the start of his new life all those years ago.  Not many comedians succeed in crafting characters who are that deep whilst also being hysterical and funny and that’s what makes this one of the best comedies of the year.

Of course, it also comes with some nicely composed music, a non-stop interesting storyline, pretty effects and a bittersweet look into the way nostalgia can make us feel and what some will be willing to sacrifice to just relive that one special moment from that one special day one last time before the world’s end. It is beautiful and moving in a way that you wouldn’t expect from a modern-day comedy. Y’know, just look at Grow Ups 2. Like… seriously, just look at it!

5/5 whatever

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